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Sunday, 26 January 2014

Butter is best

 http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/news/butter-is-back-margarine-giant-admits-defeat-in-the-battle-of-the-spreads-9085486.html



Butter is back: Margarine giant admits defeat in the battle of the spreads 

 

 

Breakfast

 


The thought of a crumpet or bread with your fish and chips or even a crusty roll with the chicken soup, without the necessary 1/4 inch  of butter spread evenly across the surface (right up to the edge of course)is too awful to contemplate. Margarine of any description, even the ones where "you wont believe its not butter", has never been on my shopping list.
For many years, some doctors, medical bodies, various "old wives", experts, pundits and others have been peddling the line that butter with its saturated fats, cholesterol, calories etc etc, is very bad for us and should be avoided. The consumption of butter, was responsible for  heart disease, obesity, high cholesterol levels in the body, clogging of the arteries and all sorts of other "nasties" that the "healthy eating" lobby, aided, abetted and perhaps even funded by the manufacturers of numerous margarine alternatives could convince us of.
It has always seemed odd to me that a naturally occurring product, consisting of  butterfat, milk proteins and water, and produced by churning fresh or fermented cream or milk could be so bad for us, whereas margarine an artificially produced substance consisting of plant oils, margaric acids, some animal fats, dyes, emulsifiers and other chemical cocktails, can be of any beneficial effect on our health. Where butter has been produced and consumed for centuries, fist as a "cottage industry" (where the best butter is still to be obtained) and in later years as a part of the £ multi million food production industry, margarine is a relative newcomer to the scene having been invented less than 150 years ago.
The "anti butter brigade" has attempted all sorts of scare mongering tactics and horror stories to persuade us to convert to their artificial product and often thrown in the inducement that this or that brand tastes "just like butter", or you cant believe its not butter" or even "eight out of ten people could not tell the difference." Ironically, it has always seemed to me that if you cant tell the difference, you may as well have the real thing.
As it is Sunday morning, I think a couple of crumpets may go down very well for breakfast. With loads of butter of course.