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Sunday, 19 January 2014

Edwina Currie is the latest Tory to join in the demeaning of Foodbank users and the charities providing the facility.


Former Tory MP Edwina Currie has provoked outrage by saying that ­people who use food banks waste their money on ­tattoos and dog food.






Former Tory MP Edwina Currie



 

Edwina Currie, former junior cabinet minister, former MP, former lover of a nondescript parliamentary whip who became prime minister, crawling out from the depths of obscurity, to demonstrate that in all of her 67 years she has learned little if anything of reality in the United Kingdom. The gross generalisations pouring out of this politician turned author confirm a lack of understanding about how and why many people today, are forced into reliance on food banks and other charities for their day to day existence. With patronising comments, poorly constructed remarks and simplistic, meaningless “examples” M/s Currie or Cohen or Jones or whatever she happens to be calling herself this week, should absorb a few simple facts.
Firstly, people reliant of Foodbanks are in many instances working people who, due to government policies, particularly wage freezes and tax credit restrictions, now find themselves unable to support their families. This is not a problem of their own making and not the result of failing to “put a little bit of money to one side”. M/s Currie joins the other out of touch Tories who think that all people are fortunate enough to have high salaries and access to bottomless expense accounts.
Secondly, in less than two years, the number of people in this country reliant on Foodbanks and other charities has risen from less than 200,000 in 2012 to almost 1 million now and the prediction is that this figure will continue to grow at an ever increasing rate. Government policies and the continuing drive for more and more austerity and “welfare reforms” have condemned hundreds of thousands of people to poverty in real terms.
The comment that they are all popping off for another tattoo and a tin of dog food is crass and patronising in the extreme and ranks with remarks from Liam walker, Rupert Charles Ponsonby, Baron Freud, Iain Duncan-Smith and others which demean and patronise ordinary people.
It seems that the policy of creating division is now an accepted and encouraged tactic for diverting attention from the economic and social wasteland being created by this wretched government, orchestrating divisions within society setting one group against another.
Currie's contribution to the debate on this scandalous situation, is neither welcome nor accurate. She demonstrates her ignorance of the subject and her complete disregard for the people trapped in the poverty created by her friends in government.