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Sunday, 25 May 2014

Replace Clegg with Cable? A poor option from a poor selection.



 

Lib Dem MPs in bid to oust Nick Clegg after disastrous election results

 



Protest against leader Nick Clegg, could see Vince Cable take over.



An almost unbelievable prospect.
Clegg, an unprincipled hypocrite and opportunistic politician, who betrayed not only his party in the country, but also every principle that the Liberal Party ever stood for. In his grubby quest for a place at the cabinet table, he has demonstrated on numerous occasions over the last four years, an unswerving loyalty to a (predominately) Conservative government who have created divisions in society, unseen for almost 100 years.
The consequence of the past four years of his duplicity and in part, that of the LibDem parliamentary party, has resulted in the rejection of the Coalition junior partner at the ballot box. The LibDems now, it seems, are beginning to engineer the removal of Nick Clegg as their leader.
It is really quite incredible that the name coming to the top of the candidates on the list of potential LibDem leaders is that of Vince Cable.
The Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, has recently presided over the disastrous privatisation of Royal Mail where city banks, speculative investors and hedge funds have made £millions at the expense of the British tax payers due to the floatation price being set too low in spite of all the evidence to the contrary and presented to Cable at the time.
In addition to his inept handling of the Royal Mail privatisation fiasco, Vince Cable has a chequered past in his career in the Commons and more recently as a senior member of the coalition cabinet. Criticism of his being more convincingly Tory than most of the Tory frontbench with his enthusiastic support for spending cuts, has been voiced both within the LibDem party and in the pages of the national press. He has also drawn criticism for being inconsistent in his statements on many policy issues leading to the conclusion that he lacks conviction or understanding of the issue or both. The curious case of the journalists posing as constituents, suggest to some that Cable's view of his own of self importance, leads to a degree of gullibility, which is not a virtue for a party leader.
Should Clegg in fact be removed within the next few months, then a leadership contest will take place. If Cable is the only option that the LibDems can produce, then they are in a sadder state than is already evident.